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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: modern medicine

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  • The Rise And Falls To Modern Medicine - 361 words
    The Rise And Falls To Modern Medicine In the Miller's Tale, Geoffrey Chaucer depicts the parish priest assistant Absolon and his sexual interests in Allison, the miller's daughter. In addition to his religious duties, he also had obligations in hair cutting. He could laten blood, shave, and clippe. This latter term fives rise to the medical treatment bleeding which was performed by most barbers of that era. After the disappearance of medicine during the Dark Ages, a new knowledge surfaced throughout the medical community. During these times there were a great many scientific breakthroughs. The findings of William Harvey proved that blood traveled through veins away from the heart. Claudius G ...
    Related: medicine, modern medicine, digestive system, scientific basis, explaining
  • Abortion - 2,032 words
    Abortion Abortion in today's society has become very political. You are either pro-choice or pro-life, and there doesn't seem to be a happy medium. As we look at abortion and research its history, should it remain legal in the United States, or should it be outlawed to reduce the ever growing rate of abortion. A choice should continue to exist but the emphasis needs to be placed on education of the parties involved. James C. Mohr takes a good look at abortion in his book Abortion in America. He takes us back in history to the 1800s so we can understand how the practice and legalization of abortion has changed over the year. In the absence of any legislation whatsoever on the subject of abort ...
    Related: abortion, induced abortion, court cases, civil war, affluent
  • Advances In Medicine - 1,318 words
    Advances In Medicine As the history of medicine has evolved, a number of trends and prevailing opinions have swept the profession. One of the most subtle, and yet most revealing results of these sweeping trends manifests itself by altering the tone in medical conversations and dialogues, often available to the non-medical person in the form of texts and literature. A relatively current example appears in the form of Perri Klass A Not Entirely Benign Procedure, a text dedicated to the experiences of the author at Harvard Medical School. Published in 1987, Klass work offers an interesting, if not shocking comparison to Philippe Pinels The Clinical Training of Doctors, an article published in 1 ...
    Related: medicine, modern medicine, personal perspective, patient care, enthusiasm
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,097 words
    ... d physiological processes are closely linked. The connection between stress and immune system response, for example, is well documented (Epiro and Walsh). Some scientists suggest that the power of prayer and faith healing, like some forms of meditation, might also be physiological in that they may protect the body from the negative effects of stress hormone norepinephrine. In addition, experience shows that relaxation techniques can help patients enormously. 'Medicine is a three-legged stool,' says Dr. Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical School (Epiro and Walsh). 'One leg is pharmaceuticals, the other is surgery, and the third is what people can do for themselves. Mind-body work is an esse ...
    Related: alternative medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, modern medicine, sports medicine
  • Ancient Egyptian Medicine - 1,065 words
    ... le from the Fourth Dynasty that indicates that there was an attempt to drill a hole in one of the teeth. Possibly the first prosthesis was found in 1929 in Giza where two teeth were found with gold wire fixed to the teeth. Also they have found several mummies with artificial teeth. The study of several mummies indicates poor teeth condition. This can be attributed to the lack of nutrition, mostly lower class citizens. In the Papyrus Ebers, they found parts of a dental monograph titled "The Beginning of Remedies for Stronger Teeth." Carious teeth were treated with a mixture of ocher, flour, spelt, and honey. Fillings were made out of a combination of malachite and resin. The Ancient Egypt ...
    Related: ancient egyptians, egyptian, medicine, modern medicine, lower class
  • Aristotle - 847 words
    Aristotle Aristotle, Galileo, and Pasteur can be said to have contributed significantly, each in his own way, to the development of "The Scientific Method." Discuss. What is the scientific method? In general, this method has three parts, which we might call (1) gathering evidence, (2) making a hypothesis, and (3) testing the hypothesis. As scientific methodology is practiced, all three parts are used together at all stages, and therefore no theory, however rigorously tested, is ever final, but remains at all times tentative, subject to new observation and continued testing by such observation. Hellenic science was built upon the foundations laid by Thales and Pythagoras. It reached its zenit ...
    Related: aristotle, common sense, charles darwin, louis pasteur, history
  • Barbara Mason - 1,067 words
    Barbara Mason Human Growth and Development Anne Brooks Lesson 11:Ages 65 on up: Late Adulthood The Results of Aging THEORIES OF WHY WE AGE Since research into aging is not guided by any one universally accepted theory, genetic, cellular, and physiological studies have yielded several hypotheses. Genetics The most popular genetic theory, the Error Theory, assumes that aging is the result of the accumulation of random genetic damage, or from small errors in the flow of genetic information. The damage or errors would reduce or prevent proper cell function. Cellular The best known theory of aging in cellular research is called the Hayflick Effect, which is named after the American microbiologist ...
    Related: barbara, mason, computer software, cognitive functioning, limiting
  • Cloning Should Be Permitted - 480 words
    Cloning Should Be Permitted Cloning Should Be Permitted Cloning has been a very controversial topic since it affects moral values of human beings and other living things alike. In February 1997, scientists announced the birth of the first cloned sheep, and this predicted the future of cloning possibilities. The scientists began extensive experiments on cloning and have cloned both plants and animals successfully. The next step was to clone actual human beings. Before the experiments could have been carried out, pressure from the society started build on the scientists. Governments began to introduce bans on cloning, because they felt cloning was not ethical and morally correct. Cloning has i ...
    Related: cloning, permitted, different ways, endangered species, unnatural
  • Cystic Fibrosis - 1,101 words
    ... o a human. These were milestones in finding a cure or a preventive treatment. They were huge steps because it marked the first time that scientists were able to test new technology in people with the disease. Also in October of 93'12 scientists at the University of Iowa made another big step, they determined that the CF gene treatment worked! It had repaired the defective CF cells. This too was the first time that the basic defect was corrected in people with the disease. Doctors and scientists know that the gene number 7 is the gene that CF is found upon. They also know that gene's protein product most likely induces the movement of chloride directly or indirectly. They named the protei ...
    Related: cystic, cystic fibrosis, fibrosis, lung cancer, general information
  • Donor - 636 words
    Donor The book starts by telling about the problems occurring in the hospital where Michael works. Too many patients are dying of causes that would not normally kill them. When Michael watches a little girl's life slip away despite the best that modern medicine can deliver, he becomes depressed about his choice of careers. Across town, a popular and prominent Congressman dies - his skull shattered by a shotgun, but police investigators determine the death to be a suicide. Despite what they say, the Congressman's beautiful young daughter, Shannon Donnelly, stubbornly refuses to believe that her father took his own life. In a twist of events, Michael becomes the top contender for the dead Cong ...
    Related: donor, research center, technological advances, amusement park, realistic
  • Edward Jenner - 501 words
    Edward Jenner Brooke Basiri Mrs. Frey World History Honors 14 April 2000 Edward Jenner was born in Berkeley in 1749. Orphaned until he was 5 years old, his brothers and sisters wanted him to get involved with medicine. He completed his training with the great surgeon John Hunter at St. George's Hospital in London. At the age of 23 he returned to Berkeley as the local doctor, leaving only to continue smaller practices in London and Cheltenham. The Chantry became his home for 38 years. From the early days of his career, Jenner was interested by country-lore which held that milk-maids who caught the cowpox could not catch smallpox, one of the most feared diseases of all time. (It had been know ...
    Related: edward, jenner, world history, health organization, dedicated
  • Euthanasia - 345 words
    Euthanasia Euthanasia Euthanasia has brought great attention to the public eye since Dr. Jack Kevorkian was discovered for contributing to these horrible inhumane acts. At the present time, the state of Oregon has the world's only law specifically permitting a doctor to prescribe lethal drugs for the purpose of ending a patient's life (http://www.iaetf.org/faq.htm). Why has only one state that happens to be in the United States contributed to this horrible controversy? Euthanasia tends to attract people that are terminally ill who desire death and are usually depressed. A good medical doctor would prescribe an individual some antidepressant medication before taking ones life. Euthanasia allo ...
    Related: euthanasia, social issues, jack kevorkian, medical doctor, depressed
  • Euthanasia - 1,302 words
    Euthanasia There are numerous controversial issues that currently affect the evolving field of psychology. Unsolved issues on human experimentation, abortion, genetic testing, animal rights are a few examples of themes that arouse conflict and contention. Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted suicide is yet another controversial issue that has particular relevance to the field of psychology because of the apparent moral and ethical dilemmas involved. Euthanasia, by definition "a happy death," implies an easy or painless death. The purpose of this procedure is usually to end suffering analogous to the phrase "mercy killing," the practice of putting to death a persons suffering from incurable cond ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, medical technology, slippery slope, completion
  • Euthanasia - 1,452 words
    Euthanasia The word euthanasia is derived from the Greek word eu for good and thantos which means death and originally referred to intentional mercy killing. But the word it euthanasia has acquired a more complex meaning in modern times. Proponents of euthanasia believe that a dying patient has the right to end their suffering and leave the world in a dignified manner. Those who contest euthanasia believe that man does not have the right to end another person's life no matter what pain they endure. Euthanasia is one of the most important public policy issues being debated today. The outcome of debate will profoundly affect family relationships, interaction between doctors and patients, and c ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, passive euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, attempted suicide
  • Existentialism - 1,657 words
    ... I can now term the Underground Man (thanks to this class!). That was when I was overly conscious, hyper-aware, and very insecure. I was far from the state of the Underground Man, but surely in the initial stages of paranoid-schizophrenia! My thoughts seemed diseased. Not that consciousness itself was a disease, but that my heightened awareness was in some way poisoned. Thus I feel Dostoevsky (when I say Dostoevsky I am speaking of his Underground Man) is wrong to call consciousness a disease. His disgusting thoughts are not the product of higher consciousness but of a diseased mind. His thoughts are not normal; this is what I believe. Dostoevsky admits right away that he is more intelli ...
    Related: existentialism, higher level, black hole, modern medicine, focuses
  • George W Bush - 751 words
    George W. Bush In this brief essay about Governor Bush, I will be talking about my standings on regarding his issues. I think Bush is making a great decision to reduce or completely stop abortion. Abortion is just like taking someone else's life. It is just as if someone was to go outside and shoot someone and go on with his or her life like nothing happened. In a way it is basically murder. What I dont get is why he won't force litmus paper test yet he wants to reduce the rate of abortions. I think he has the right idea in mind, but is just a little confused with what he wants to accomplish when he becomes president. Governor Bush believes that the best way to protect the innocent is to ful ...
    Related: bush, george w. bush, public schools, achievement gap, reform
  • Hmos Healthcare Of The Beast - 1,030 words
    HMOs Healthcare of the Beast HMOs: The Health Care of the Beast Many people are concerned about rising health care costs. In reaction to this, some individuals and companies are gravitating toward the assumed lower prices of Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) health plans. HMOs spend billions of dollars each year advertising their low cost services. While these savings look good on paper, there are many pages of small print. The explanation after the asterisk indicates that not only do the HMOs lack lower costs, but they also short-change the patient in quality care. Much of the money spent on premiums goes directly into the pockets of stockholders and less is then available for patient c ...
    Related: beast, healthcare, hmos, patient care, health maintenance
  • Homeopathy - 1,333 words
    Homeopathy Running head: HOMEOPATHY Theory of Homeopathy Abstract A large portion of the United States population believes that alternative approaches to health care are less evasive and more effective than so-called Western medicine. This report looks at the efficacy of homeopathy. As this therapy moves into the mainstream there is a need for doctors and nurses to understand its benefits and possible adverse effects. Theory of Homeopathy Homeopathy is a type of medical treatment that is based on the theory of treating certain diseases with very small doses of drugs that, in a healthy person and in large doses, would produce symptoms like those of the disease (Webster, 1982). From the transc ...
    Related: homeopathy, modern times, placebo effect, adverse effects, nursing
  • Immigration Problem - 1,986 words
    Immigration Problem The world has gone through a revolution and it has changed a lot. We have cut the death rates around the world with modern medicine and new farming methods. For example, we sprayed to destroy mosquitoes in Sri Lanka in the 1950s. In one year, the average life of everyone in Sri Lanka was extended by eight years because the number of people dying from malaria suddenly declined. This was a great human achievement. But we cut the death rate without cutting the birth rate. Now population is soaring. There were about one billion people living in the world when the Statue of Liberty was built. There are 4.5 billion today. World population is growing at an enormous rate. The wor ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration problem, legal immigration
  • Legalizing Marijuana - 1,374 words
    Legalizing Marijuana Cannabis sativa or marijuana has been cultivated for over 5,000 years. The plant spreads like milkweed and will eventually run out any other plants nearby. In the wild, or grown with care marijuana can grow to be 3 - 20 feet high. The plant itself can be used for rope, material, medicine or for smoking. But, whatever way you choose to use this plant, it is illegal. It was made a law in the early 1900's that it was illegal to smoke, eat, or get high from this plant. The plant's only legal use was for rope and materials. Even this was controlled by the government though. In the 1960's and 1970's a group of youth stereotyped as Hippies were using marijuana on a regular basi ...
    Related: legalize marijuana, legalizing, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, economic times
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