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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: national income

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  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • Chinas Economics - 2,814 words
    Chinas Economics For various reasons, China has always been an important country in the world. With its increasing large population, it was determined by other countries that is has a lot of economic potentials. In just one decade and a half, China has transformed itself from a giant that use to live in poverty into a wealthy powerhouse to the world economy. With one-fifth of the worlds population, China is now producing 4% of world merchandise and a proportion of global production. It has also one of the worlds oldest and most influential civilizations. China has established three approaches to the world economy and they are establishing an alternative socialist system (1950s); isolating it ...
    Related: economic activity, economic freedom, economic growth, economic outlook, economic reform, economic stability, economic system
  • Circular Flow Of Economics - 712 words
    Circular Flow of Economics The circular flow model is defined as the flow of resources from households to firms and of products to firms from households. These flows are accompanied by reverse flows of money from firms to households and from households to firms. The circular flow is comprised of the resource market, households, product market, businesses, and the government. Macroeconomics - The study of the aggregate (total) Behavior of the whole economy. Macroeconomics Aggregates: - Unemployment rate: Percent of people in the labor force is not working but searching for work. - Inflation rate: Percent rise in the average price of all goods and services. - GDP: Dollar value of all final goo ...
    Related: circular, economic activity, economics, flow, gross domestic
  • Economic Statistics - 696 words
    Economic Statistics 1. Traffic Congestion If a city council faces severe problems with traffic congestion, a knowledge will benefit all parties. It is this I will debate in the lines to come. When traffic is a problem in a city, all sorts of means of transportation can be included, but it is mainly cars which seem to be the problem. Therefor raising gasolin prices (by putting an extra tax on them) should instinctively reduce car usage, seeing that costs for the driver would go up. This is though only the case, if demand for gasolin is inelastic (fig. 1). Here a tax on gasoling has moved the supply curve to S2 and the price to P2, which has lead the quantity demanded from Q to Q2. The differe ...
    Related: statistics, public sector, growth rate, social costs, consumer
  • Economics Of Immigration - 1,228 words
    Economics Of Immigration From the origin of the United States, immigration has been crucial for the economic advancement and expansion of the nation. The US truly is a melting pot of many cultures and ideas, and it has benefited greatly from its diversity. However, with a much-reduced demand for unskilled or low-skilled workers, US policy must adapt so that it can better maximize the net economic benefits of immigration. While this probably does not include a universal drop in the number of legal immigrants, it would include the screening of applicants in such a way that preference is given to more economically beneficial candidates. It would also include making families totally responsible ...
    Related: economic benefits, economics, immigration, immigration policy, legal immigration
  • European Studies - 2,610 words
    ... opean Social Fund (ESF), the European Agricultural Guarantee and Guidance Fund (EAGGF) (although only Guidance is relevant to Structural Funds) and the Financial Instrument for Fisheries Guidance (FIFG). (24) The Structural Funds are aimed at reducing regional and social disparities in the EU. Between 1989 and 194 the funds were allocated 10,000 million ECU per annum. (25) The EAGGF supports the modernisation of holdings, the processing and marketing of products and agricultural development measures and the promotion of local produce. The FIFG is responsible for the fishing fleet, aquaculture and coastal waters, fishing port facilities and the marketing of fishery and aquaculture. The ER ...
    Related: european community, european union, macmillan publishing company, young people, aquaculture
  • Federal Reserve Monetary Policy - 3,287 words
    Federal Reserve Monetary Policy If taxation without representation could rally the colonists against the British Crown in 1776, tight money and ruinous interest rates might be cause for populist revolt in our own day. Federal Reserve monetary policy also has severe social burdens, measured by huge changes in aggregate output, income, and employment. The imperious Fed, much like the English Crown two centuries ago, formulates and carries out its policy directives without democratic input, accountability, or redress. Not only has the Fed's monetary restraint at times deliberately pushed the economy into deep recession, with the attendant loss of millions of jobs, but also its impact on the str ...
    Related: economic policy, federal budget, federal funds, federal government, federal open market, federal open market committee, federal reserve
  • Global Imbalance In Food Supply - 646 words
    Global Imbalance In Food Supply Right now, developing countries are starving to death and the developed countries are worried about which type of cheese they should buy. This is called an imbalance in food supply. There's too much food in the developed countries, and not enough in the developing countries. Three quarters of the world's population is inadequately fed and the majority of these live in the developing countries. Massive surpluses exist in Europe and the US. Malnutrition and undernutrition is generally caused by poverty. Markets in the developed countries are often too big and produce too much food for a population to consume. Developed countries' agriculture is lacking from unem ...
    Related: food production, food security, food supply, imbalance, national income
  • Great Gatsby And American Dream - 987 words
    ... distribution increased their share of the national income. Labors share of the national income did not rise at all, and workers suffered from unemployment. By implication, then, the decade differed little from earlier ones (431). This shows why George Wilson and others like him remain in a slump and do not prosper in business, whereas people like Tom Buchanan, have an increase in their yearly earnings. It almost seems that the statement; "hard work does not always equal success" was a false statement in the 20s. If a person only looks at the top five percent of the income bracket, they may be right. However, if a person were to look at the other ninety-five percent, this person would se ...
    Related: american, american dream, dream, gatsby, great gatsby, the great gatsby
  • Harroddomar Model - 1,132 words
    Harrod-Domar Model The Harrod-Domar Model is the simplest and best-known production function used in the analysis of economic development. This model explains the relationship between the growth and unemployment in advanced capitalist societies. However, the Harrod-Domar Model is used in developing nations as an easy way of looking at the relationships between growth and capital requirements. This model does explain the differences in growth performances between countries. The model allows you to predict an estimate of growth for a nation. Which can be compared to predictions of growth for a different country. B) The "sources of growth" is a different form of the production function. This ne ...
    Related: national product, production function, equal opportunity, macro, institutions
  • Imf - 1,096 words
    Imf Introduction: We are all aware of the enormous difficulty that the Asian countries have been having in regard to their economies having large trade deficits and the devaluation of their currencies. Asia's crisis was classified as "The Great Asian Slump that is for the record books" ("Saving Asia it's time to get radical," 75) making the Latin America's crisis of 1995 look like a minor wobble. Hong Kong announced that its economy shrank 2.8% in the first quarter of 1998. Economist forecast Indonesia's GDP to fall an overwhelming 15.1% this year. Comparing that to Americas worst post war recession when the economy shrank 2.1% ("Saving Asia, It's time to get radical," 75). This record-break ...
    Related: private sector, international trade, monetary fund, export
  • Inflation - 1,230 words
    Inflation INFLATION Inflation, in economics, is used to describe an increase in the value of money; in relation to the goods and services it will buy. Inflation is the sustained rise in the aggregate level of prices measured by an index of the cost of various goods and services. Repetitive price increase cause the purchasing power of money and other financial assets with fixed values, creating serious economic uncertainty. Inflation results when actual economic pressures anticipation of future developments cause the demand for goods and services to exceed the supply available at existing prices or when available output is restricted by undecided productivity and marketplace constraints. Cons ...
    Related: inflation, inflation rate, american revolution, middle ages, scarcity
  • International Marketing - 1,300 words
    ... for the Patras operation was US$15 million. The equipment manufacturer, F.L. Smidth of Copenhagen would finance 40 percent of capital expenditures, and another 20 percent would be financed through the National Investment Bank for Industrial Development, SA. The remaining 60 percent of Patras shares would be equity, of which 75 percent of shares would be owned by Yankee, and 25 percent of Patras shares would be owned by Titan. The international division manager of Yankee, Bob Walbecker, dealt with the Manourpoulos family, who were the owners of Titan. After establishing the connection with Titan, Mr. Walbecker continued to establish good rapport between his division and Titan. Ten days af ...
    Related: international business, international management, international marketing, marketing, business environment
  • Japans Rise - 1,280 words
    Japan`s Rise Japan is one of the world's leading economic powers when concentrating on its Gross Domestic Product of four point two trillion United States dollars. Its economy is only second to the United States in terms of production. However, Japan has not always contained a relatively strong economy. The Japanese's economic strategies have boosted economy to new heights since its fall during the second world war because of their unorthodox manner of business etiquette, innovative strategy, and strong relations with stable economies such as Canada and the United States. The rise to the top did not occur without a large struggle as many problems did occur after the Second World War left Jap ...
    Related: national income, invisible hand, trade deficit, productivity, mumps
  • Keynesian Economics - 1,668 words
    Keynesian Economics Macroeconomics, branch of economics concerned with the aggregate, or overall, economy. Macroeconomics deals with economic factors such as total national output and income, unemployment, balance of payments, and the rate of inflation. It is distinct from microeconomics, which is the study of the composition of output such as the supply and demand for individual goods and services, the way they are traded in markets, and the pattern of their relative prices. At the basis of macroeconomics is an understanding of what constitutes national output, or national income, and the related concept of gross national product (GNP). The GNP is the total value of goods and services produ ...
    Related: economic activity, economic forecasting, economic growth, economics, keynesian, keynesian economics
  • Market Economy Vs Command Economy - 1,272 words
    Market Economy Vs. Command Economy Intorduction: Within the overall umbrella of the word economy, one speaks today of the market economy, the formal economy, the informal economy, the underground economy, the productive economy and perhaps even the reproductive economy, the post-industrial or post-modern economy and the global economy. Thus while the concept of an economy is not fixed but arbitrary, and may have strayed rather far from the management of household resources, it is nonetheless spoken of in official circles as if there were genuine agreement (sometimes almost as if it were tangible, as we must get the economy back on track). The official economic paradigm operative in Canada is ...
    Related: command, command economy, economy, global economy, market, market economy, underground economy
  • Nafta - 1,096 words
    Nafta In January 1994, the United States, Mexico, and Canada implemented the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), forming the largest free trade zone in the world. The goal of NAFTA is to create better trading conditions through tariff reduction, removal of investment barriers, and improvement of intellectual property protection. NAFTA continues to gradually reduce tariffs on set dates and aims to eliminate all tariffs by the year 2004. Before NAFTA was established, investing in Mexico was a difficult process. Investors needed the Mexican Government's approval and were also required to meet specific investment guidelines. These requirements necessitated investors to export a set leve ...
    Related: nafta, united states economy, north american, domestic product, producing
  • Nafta - 1,833 words
    NAFTA In January 1994, the United States, Mexico, and Canada implemented the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The goal of NAFTA is to create better trading conditions through tariff reduction, removal of investment barriers, and improvement of intellectual property protection. NAFTA continues to gradually reduce tariffs on set dates and aims to eliminate all tariffs by the year 2004. Before NAFTA was established, investing in Mexico was a difficult process. Investors needed the Mexican Government's approval and were also required to meet specific investment guidelines. These requirements necessitated investors to export a set level of goods and services, utilize domestic goods an ...
    Related: nafta, member states, south american, south american countries, expand
  • Nafta - 1,888 words
    ... d Uruguay joined the Treaty later the dates for the elimination of their tariffs are pushed back a whole year so that by the year 2000 they will have 100 percent eliminated tariffs. The downfall of this elimination of tariffs is that some businesses will have to cut back and restructure so some people will loose their jobs, but in the long run the economy will grow stronger from it. However, the social security system for the countries will be transformed such that a worker can work in any of the member countries and accumulate years until retirement and still receive a pension (americasnet.com). Each of the countries is using MERCOSUR in a different way to increase their productivity. I ...
    Related: nafta, national income, important role, quantity supplied, employment
  • Nazism - 1,087 words
    Nazism The most merciless and cruel party in the world, was under the role of Adolf Hitler, their violence remained a deep gash in the western world history. Nazism was originated in Germany in the early 1920s. It was the doctrines or practices of the Nazi party. Nazism was a shortened version of the tern National Socialism, denoting the doctrine and form of government of Nazi Germany under the rule of Adolf as enunciated in his book Mein Kampf. The term was an abbreviation of Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (German National Socialist Worker Party). National Socialist German Workers Party founded in 1919 on fascist principles and dominant from 1933 to 1945 in Germany. The part ...
    Related: nazism, after world, judicial review, adolf hitler, protest
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