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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: popes

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  • Alexander Popes Elegy To The Memory Of An Unfortunate Lady - 1,019 words
    Alexander PopeS Elegy To The Memory Of An Unfortunate Lady In Alexander Pope's poem "Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady," Pope uses a great amount of war-like imagery to enhance his vision of the suicide described. He creates allies and enemies, weapons and invasions, as well as the gruesome death that only seems to come from war. These pieces add to the overall meaning of the work and the vision of the event that has occurred, giving the reader an image of a battle occurring. The first images of the war or battle are that of the victim of battle. Starting at line four and extending to line ten, I find that Pope is using a great amount of imagery to depict the woman's wound and the f ...
    Related: alexander, popes, unfortunate, civil war, justice system
  • Alexander Popes The Rape Of The Lock - 1,658 words
    Alexander Pope's The Rape Of The Lock The Rape of the Lock: Serious Stuff Alexander Pope's mock heroic epic The Rape of the Lock appears to be a light subject addressed with a satiric tone and structure. Pope often regards the unwanted cutting of a woman's hair as a trivial thing, but the fashionable world takes it seriously. Upon closer examination Pope has, perhaps unwittingly, broached issues worthy of earnest consideration. The Rape of the Lock at first glance is a commentary on human vanity and the ritual of courtship. The poem also discusses the relationship between men and women, which is the more substantial matter in particular. Pope examines the oppressed position of women. Infring ...
    Related: alexander, lock, pope alexander, popes, rape
  • Abuses Of The Medieval Catholic Clergy - 1,431 words
    Abuses of the Medieval Catholic Clergy The Dark Ages of Europe were called such for several reasons. One of the more notorious reasons was the state of the Catholic Church. In the years before the Reformation, members of the Catholic clergy had reached an all time low in terms of their morality. The abuses of clerical power and privileges by the medieval clergy spanned all parts of their daily lives. Members of the Catholic clergy were financially, politically and socially corrupt. Each of these corruptions made up the enormous religious corruption that was the logical result of such debauchery. Of the several grievances against the Church, [t]he first and sorest was that she loved money, an ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, clergy, medieval, ordinary people
  • Agony And Ectacy - 1,906 words
    Agony and Ectacy THEME: When looking at the life of one of historys greatest men, the lessons we might learn are countless, despite Irving Stones fictional twists. Before we can begin to examine The Agony and the Ecstasy, we must understand Michelangelo and other artists as Stone saw them. Stone considered the artist a creator as well as a part of creation, just as God is seen in many of todays ideologies. Michelangelos life can likewise be paralleled to Genesis. At first Michael is lonely and friendless, he then decides to take up and apprenticeship and create works of art just as the Lord years to love and creates man. His creation however will face the evils of envy and jealousy just as w ...
    Related: agony, family farm, leonardo da vinci, pope julius, disciple
  • An, Who Would Give All Of His Followers Something They Had Never Had Before Faith, And The Ability To See Others, Love Others - 348 words
    an, who would give all of his followers something they had never had before; faith, and the ability to see others, love others, and talk to others. The basic lines of Catholic Mariology (theology of Mary) are now to talked about and to debated beyond dispute, written as they are in the Scriptures, in the liturgy, in prayer, poetry, song and art, in the writings of saints and theologians and in the teaching of popes and councils. Mary holds a secure place as the mother of Jesus, the greatest of all saints. Mary gives hope and faith to everyone on earth. She is full of love for others and full of love from God. Having conceived the Son of God in her womb by the story of immaculate conception, ...
    Related: immaculate conception, devotion, theology, fidelity
  • Biography On Michelangelo - 879 words
    Biography On Michelangelo "Trifles make perfections, and perfection is no trifle," Michelangelo once stated. He is one of the greatest artists of all time and is unmatched by any other. Michelangelo is the creator of works of sublime beauty that express the full breadth of human condition. Yet, he was caught between conflicting powers and whims of his patrons, the Medici's of Florence and Papacy's in Rome. Michelangelo was born on the sixth of March in 1475, the second of five brothers in a small town called Caprese, in Tuscany. He always considered himself to be a Florentine, as did his father. Francesca Neri, his mother, was sick and frail. As a result, he stayed with a nurse in a family o ...
    Related: biography, michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, last judgment, sistine ceiling
  • British Church In The 14th Century - 1,396 words
    British Church In The 14Th Century In the summer of 1381 a large group of peasants led by Wat Tyler stormed London. These peasants, unwilling to pay another poll tax to pay for an unpopular war against France and discontent with unfair labor wages, freed prisoners from London prisons, killed merchants, and razed the home of John of Gaunt, considered the creator of the poll tax. Perhaps more important, however, was the rebels attack on the Temple, a symbol of the British Church's wealth and power. The rebels burned the charters, legal records of the Church's vast land-holdings, stored within the Temple. This act - a religious building being targeted of in rebellion against a mismanaged, abusi ...
    Related: british, british society, political power, great schism, archbishop
  • Byzantine Empire - 1,969 words
    Byzantine Empire The greatest of medieval civilizations was the Eastern Roman Empire. The Roman Empire was divided in 395. The Western half, ruled from Rome, was ruled by the barbarians in the 5th century. The Eastern half, known as the Byzantine Empire, lasted for more than over 1,000 years. The Byzantine Empire was one of the leading civilizations in the world. In 324, Constantine, the first Christian emperor, became the single ruler of the Roman Empire. He set up his Eastern headquarters at the ancient Greek colony of Byzantium in 330. This city, later renamed Constantinople, was also known as new Rome. It became the capital of the Byzantines after the Roman Empire was divided. Constantin ...
    Related: byzantine, byzantine art, byzantine empire, empire, roman empire
  • Charles V - 2,540 words
    Charles V Emperor Charles V (CHARLES I, King of SPAIN). Born at Ghent, 1500; died at Yuste, in Spain, 1558; was a descendant of the house of Hapsburg, and to this descent owed his sovereignty over so many lands that it was said of him that the sun never set on his dominions. Charles was the son of Philip, Duke of Burgundy, by Joanna, daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, and Burgundy was the first heritage to which he at his led, on his fathers death in 1506. As he was a minor at that time, his aunt, Margaret of Austria, undertook the regency for him. William of Chivres, his father's chief counsellor, had charge of the prince's household; Adrian of Utrecht, the Humanist and professor of theolo ...
    Related: charles i, charles v, police system, political power, siege
  • Christian Church In Middle Ages - 1,477 words
    Christian Church In Middle Ages The Christian Church in the Middle Ages played a significant role in society. Unfortunately though, the church is often regarded as the capital of corruption, evil, and worldliness. Today, so many people depict the medieval church as being led by materialistic popes, devouring tithes from poverty-stricken peasants, having various illegitimate children, and granting indulgences for money from wayward believers. Yes, circumstances like this may have been the case, and is often hard to disapprove, considering the fact that this notion is often advocated in movies. But we must open our mind, and look at the situations first before jumping to conclusions. As many t ...
    Related: christian, christian church, church history, medieval church, middle ages
  • Controversies Between Church And State - 407 words
    Controversies Between Church And State Controversies Between Church and State During the Middle Ages, church and state leaders had many battles. Some who were involved were Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich IV and Pope Gregory VIII; King II and Archbishop Thomas Becket; King Philip IV and Pope Boniface VIII. Their situations were all related by the fact that they were all controversies between an emperor or king and the Catholic church. The Holy Roman Emperor Heinrich (Henry) IV and Pope Gregory VIIIs struggle was centered on by investiture. Henry invested many bishops at his own will even though Gregory had banned investiture by laity. Henry felt his investiture of bishops was necessary to the co ...
    Related: catholic church, church and state, higher power, pope boniface, gregory
  • Crusades - 489 words
    Crusades The Crusades were Europe's version for "holy wars" during the Middle Ages. The official First Crusade began in 1096-1099. The First Crusade conquered a strip of land along the eastern coast of the Mediteranean about 500 miles long and averaging 40 miles wide. This European foothold in the Middle East was divided into four little kingdoms; the county of edessa, the Principality of Antioch, the County of Tripoli and the kingdom of Jerusalem this kingdoms were ruled by the Muslims soon recognized and began to reconquer this territory. The Second Crusade started in 1147-1149. The Christian forces in the Holy Land grew weak. In 1144, the Turks conquered the county of Edessa. The threat t ...
    Related: crusades, first crusade, second crusade, king richard, robin hood
  • Crusades And The Church - 758 words
    Crusades And The Church Crusades and the Church At the time of the Crusades, the official church had become corrupt and politically motivated. It should be noted, too, that crusaders did not take vows to go on crusade. The very term crusade, in English or in any other language, is a much later invention. What we call crusades, contemporaries knew as pilgrimages or even simply journeys. Aside from a tiny elite, people were illiterate and even if they could read, there was no access to a Bible or any scriptural teaching. It was an age of superstition and magic, where visions, signs and wonders were claimed by many. The masses' only source of knowledge about God was whatever the often corrupt a ...
    Related: crusades, canon law, holy war, pope innocent iii, unlawful
  • Dantes Divine Comedy - 1,340 words
    Dante's Divine Comedy In Dante's Divine Comedy, Dante incorporates Virgil's portrayal of Hades from The Aeneid into his poem, and similarities between the Inferno and Hades can be drawn, however Dante wasn't attempting to duplicate Virgil's works. Although the Hell depicted in Dante's Inferno is essentially based on the literary construction of the underworld found in Virgil's Aeneid, in their particulars the two kingdoms are quite different. Virgil's underworld is largely undifferentiated, and Aeneas walks through it without taking any particular notice of the landscape or the quality of suffering that takes place among the dead. Aeneas' first concern is with the fate of his friends, then w ...
    Related: comedy, divine, divine comedy, historical figures, judas iscariot
  • Darwin - 2,435 words
    Darwin From his theories that he claimed were developed during his voyage, Darwin eventually wrote his Origin of Species and Descent of Man, which exploded into the world market over twenty years after his return home. Wallace, King and Sanders wrote in Biosphere, The Realm of Life: In 1859, Charles Darwin published a theory of evolution that implied that humans evolved from apes. . .The Darwinian revolution was the greatest paradigm shift in the history of biology, and it greatly changed the way that ordinary men and women viewed their own place in the world. (1) World Book tells us: (2). . .The study of the specimens from the voyage of the Beagle convinced Darwin that modern species had ev ...
    Related: charles darwin, darwin, origin of species, the bible, diversity
  • Death Of A Salesman Willy - 1,281 words
    Death of a Salesman - Willy The differences between eighteenth-century literature and romantic poems, with respect to history is constituted here. This is seen through the influential works of John Keats and Alexander Pope. These works are acknowledged as, "The Rape of Lock" and "The Eve of St. Agnes." Alexander Pope takes his readers on a hatred filled epic. A robust piece of literature and love induced psychoses in, "The Rape of Lock." On the other hand, "The Eve of St. Agnes" told a tale of life, love, death, and eternal fate in heaven. These two brilliant writers have given two magnificent poems. Pope exhibits many characteristics of a narcissistic human being. His independence in life s ...
    Related: death of a salesman, salesman, willy, john keats, gothic style
  • Decline Of Catholicism Oral - 1,083 words
    Decline Of Catholicism (Oral) Picture this if you will. In the beginning (being 1945) god created a shepherd (the Catholic Church) in which we the sheep followed blindly. Everywhere the shepherd took us, we would follow without complaint. A sheep dared not question the Shepherd or stray from the flock in fear of being labeled a bad sheep (catholic) and suffering the consequences of eternal damnation. But as time went on and the sheep modernized, however the shepherd was stubborn and conservative in his ways and refused to change. So the sheep began to stray from the shepherd with little fear, scattering, going to other pastures and other flocks with other Shepherds. The Shepherd realized his ...
    Related: catholicism, decline, oral, mass media, decision making
  • Dorthy Day - 1,726 words
    ... d that, in contrast with most charitable centers, no one at the Catholic Worker set about reforming them. A crucifix on the wall was the only unmistakable evidence of the faith of those welcoming them. The staff received only food, board and occasional pocket money. The Catholic Worker became a national movement. By 1936 there were 33 Catholic Worker houses spread across the country. Due to the Depression, plenty of people needed them. The Catholic Worker attitude toward those who were welcomed wasn't always appreciated. These weren't the deserving poor, it was sometimes objected, but drunkards and good-for-nothings. A visiting social worker asked Day how long the clients were permitted ...
    Related: christian life, twentieth century, catholic church, machine, japan
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,705 words
    ... ion that was to last for 400 years. William was a hard ruler, punishing England, especially the north, when it disputed his authority. His power and efficiency can be seen in the Domesday Survey, a census for tax purposes, and in the Salisbury Oath of allegiance, which he demanded of all tenants. He appointed Lanfranc, an Italian clergyman, as archbishop of Canterbury. He also promoted church reform, especially by the creation of separate church courts, but retained royal control. When William died in 1087, he gave England to his second son, William II (Rufus), and Normandy to his eldest son, Robert. Henry, his third son, in due time got bothEngland in 1100, when William II died in a hun ...
    Related: bank of england, church of england, division, great britain, great schism, latin, political ideas
  • Florence,italy - 799 words
    Florence,Italy Florence is located in central Italy. Florence was built on both sides of the Arno River, which causes flooding from time to time. Florence has many hills there hills which cause a very changeable type of climate with the help of the Arno River. Summers are hot and humid, and winters cool and wet. There are many advantages to having the city where it is at. The city was about 145 miles northwest of Rome, which is an important city to trade with. The Arno river gives Italy easy access to water and trade from the river to the Meditarian sea. The hills of the city offered some protection from outside invasions. Florence started out in 59 B.C. as a colony for soldiers for the Roma ...
    Related: roman empire, police chief, leonardo da vinci, flooding, sculptor
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