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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: samuel adams

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  • A Peoples History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary - 831 words
    A People's History Of The United States Chapter Four Summary As the British and Colonists were engaged in the Seven Years War against the French and Indians, the colonists were slowly building up feelings for their removal from under the British crown. There had been several uprisings to overthrow the colonial governments. When the war ended and the British were victorious, they declared the Proclamation of 1763 which stated that the land west of the Appalachians was to be reserved for the Native American population. The colonists were confused and outraged and the now ambitious social elite's were raring to direct that anger against the English since the French were no longer a threat. Howe ...
    Related: american history, history, peoples history, summary, native american
  • Alcohol Tobacco Advertising On The Web - 1,210 words
    Alcohol & Tobacco Advertising On The Web As adults, how do we encourage our children to explore the rich resources of the Internet without exposing them to a steady stream of marketing massages, such as junk e-mail, sexually explicit material and hate-mail? This is a question that many people in our society, including parents and educators are struggling to answer. Although we have yet to reach a consensus on this matter, one possible solution is to filter or block this objectionable material from our children without interfering with the rights of adults to view and visit any Web site they like. When the US Supreme Court overturned the Communications Decency Act in June of 1997, industry an ...
    Related: advertising, advertising campaign, alcohol, big tobacco, online advertising, tobacco, tobacco advertising
  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • American Revolution - 3,394 words
    ... s for the first time in the 150 year old history of the British colonies in America, the Americans will pay tax not to their own local legislatures in America, but directly to England. Under the Stamp Act, all printed materials are taxed, including; newspapers, pamphlets, bills, legal documents, licenses, almanacs, dice and playing cards. The American colonists quickly unite in opposition, led by the most influential segments of colonial society - lawyers, publishers, land owners, ship builders and merchants - who are most affected by the Act, which is scheduled to go into effect on November 1. 1765 - Also in March, the Quartering Act requires colonists to house British troops and supply ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american colonists, american revolution, england colonies
  • American Revolution - 1,425 words
    American Revolution Among the many complex factors that contributed to instigating the American Revolution, two stand out most clearly: Englands imposition of taxation on the colonies and the failure of the British to gain consent of those being governed, along with the military measures England took on the colonists. Adding to these aforementioned factors were the religious and political legacy of the colonies, and the restriction of civil liberties by the British. Parliamentary taxation was undoubtedly one of the greatest factors inspiring the American public to rebel in the years leading up to the American Revolution. One of the most striking examples of this kind of taxation was the Stam ...
    Related: american, american public, american revolution, american women, british army
  • Boston Massacre - 924 words
    Boston Massacre John Hancock stated Let this sad tale of death never be told without a tear; let not the heaving bosom cease to burn with a manly indignation at the barbarous story . . . during his oration of the massacre on 5 March 1774. The Boston Massacre as it was called, was really not a massacre in the sense that a lot of people were slaughtered, it was a massacre in the sense that British governments authority was not to be tolerated. During the next eighteen months, tensions between the Colonists and the British would increase. On a cold morning in February 1770, eleven-year old Christopher Seider was one of several hundred adults and youths surrounding the house of ebenezer Richards ...
    Related: boston, boston massacre, massacre, american history, revolutionary war
  • Boston Massacre - 1,870 words
    Boston Massacre In my report I will be discussing the Boston Massacre. I will be looking at the Boston Massacre from three different perspectives. These perspectives are the Boston colonists and Samuel Adams, Tom Hutchinson, Lieutenant Governor and Acting Governor in 1770, and Captain Preston and his troops. I will also hold some depositions from people who were actually close or at the massacre. I will be show the differences on how all three felt about the situation. Due to great burden from the different acts that brought many unwanted taxes from the British government, the minds of the Boston citizens were greatly irritated. Some individuals were so irritated that they were abusive in th ...
    Related: boston, boston massacre, massacre, different ways, commanding officer
  • Boston Tea Party Leads To Independence - 1,009 words
    Boston Tea Party Leads To Independence Boston Tea Party Leads to Independence The Boston Tea Party was an important and influential part of America becoming independent from Great Britain. America was formed on the basis of being a free country, however Great Britain held it back from being autonomous. Britain controlled everything about America. Though America was free of some things like religion and politics it was still taxed on many things. Following the Seven Years War, England went through a serious financial crisis as a result of which it was obliged to impose taxes on many products. Among them in particular were goods destined for the colonies, including wine, sugar, molasses, and t ...
    Related: boston, boston harbor, boston tea party, declaration of independence, financial crisis
  • Colonial Acts - 568 words
    Colonial Acts 1773 The Tea Act. This law was passed after the Townshend Act was repealed. It started when the British heard about the colonies corresponding with one another. The Parliament decided to open a new law, the Tea Act. The Tea Act gave all the American trade to the East India Company. This angered the colonist because it put shippers and merchants out of business. Even thought now, the tea would be cheaper, they still taxes the colonists. The colonists soon retaliated by one night some colonists organized themselves. They went aboard the ships in Boston dressed like Indians and destroyed all the chests of tea on the ship. This helped lead to the revolutionary war because now the c ...
    Related: colonial, intolerable acts, east india, india company, mastering
  • Colonists - 425 words
    Colonists Britain had a new policy when it came to it's colonies. All they had to do was inforce the laws they already had, not make new ones. George Greenville, Britains Prime Minister from 1763 to 1765, didn't realize this. To raise money for Britain after the expensive French and Indian war, they decided to tighten control on the colonies The Proclamation of 1763 was the first of five laws passed to accomplish this new goal. This "proclamation" reserved lands west of the Appalachian Mtns. for use of the Indians. The frontiersmen were the first to get angry at the new land law because they wanted to settle in the unexplored west. Then in 1764 the British parliament passed the Colonial Curr ...
    Related: colonists, french and indian war, prime minister, john adams, colony
  • Events Leading Up To The American Revolution - 1,197 words
    Events Leading up to the American Revolution With the research that I have done, I have come up with the following information on the events leading to the American Revolution. After the French-Indian War the British Government decided to reap greater benefits from the colonies. The colonies were pressed with greater taxes without any representation in Britain. This eventually lead to the Boston Tea Party. In retaliation the British passed what are now considered the Intolerable (or Coercive Acts) to bring the colonies to the heal of the King. The Intolerable (or Coercive Acts) * Quartering Act: Effective March 24, 1765 This bill required that colonial authorities to furnish barracks and sup ...
    Related: american, american colonies, american colonists, american revolution, stamp act
  • Founding Of Our Nations Government - 1,542 words
    Founding Of Our Nations Government Aspects of The Founding Of Our Nations Government The Articles of Confederation were extremely important in the founding of our government today. The Articles gave us a sort of good base to start from, and was ground breaking in the shaping of our new nation. The Articles of Confederation were written by a Second Continental Congressional committee during the early part of the American Revolution in 1777. A report of the proposed articles was presented to the committee by John Dickson (committee head) just eight days after the signing of the Declaration Of Independence. The fear of the 13 colonies was to have a powerful central government, as they did in Gr ...
    Related: central government, federal government, founding, founding fathers, government regulation, national government, state government
  • Gun Control Or People Control - 1,138 words
    Gun Control Or People Control One of the biggest issues in the United States today seems to be gun control. The government is constantly proposing legislation for more and more gun control. Slowly they are chipping away at our constitutional right to keep and bear arms. You must ask yourself: For what reason does the government want to restrict law abiding citizens from owning guns? Certainly government is not so naive to think criminals will adhere to gun control laws. There just may be an underlying motive for gun control. After all, people would be easier to control if they were defenseless. Few public policy debates have been as dominated by emotion and misinformation as the one on gun c ...
    Related: control laws, gun control, self defense, crime rate, shop
  • Irvings American Progeny - 1,375 words
    ... cause whoever wins her also wins the treasures of her father. Crane recognized this fact as well as Brom Van Brunt, the story's symbol of the American people. Crane wished to take Katrina, as well as their children and possessions, and travel to new territory, away from Sleepy Hollow, where she was born and raised, much as England had taken America's resources away from her people in order to replenish depleted funds. Van Brunt recognized Crane's self-interest and therefore fought to keep the treasure where it rightfully belonged. Ichabod's destructive tendencies were shown through Irving's description of him riding to the party. "He rode with short stirrups, which brought his knees near ...
    Related: american, american fiction, american identity, american landscape, american literary, american literature, american people
  • Jane Fonda - 1,171 words
    Jane Fonda Who is Jane Fonda? This is a question often asked by many people with no one right answer. She is an actress, a fitness guru, a former communist sympathizer, and most importantly, an antiwar activist during the Vietnam War. Although Jane Fonda was honored as one of the 100 Women of the Century, her infamous name is one Vietnam veterans will never forget. As American soldiers were losing their lives, she traveled into enemy-territory, defaming American POWs, many of whom were tortured to death. Jane Fonda, a revolutionary woman whose efforts not only demoralized American servicemen but also created a personal war that would last a lifetime, mixed politics with film to make her an i ...
    Related: henry fonda, jane, jane fonda, samuel adams, vietnam veterans
  • Martha Ballard - 1,803 words
    Martha Ballard We as a society are fortunate. We have the luxury of advanced technology to include: computers, telephones, video teleconferencing equipment, cellular phones, beepers, and hospitals with the latest gadgets and gizmos. Our technology is available only because of documented historical accounts. Our idea of work is having to get in our vehicles and driving to our destination and sometimes sitting behind a desk all day to push paper; the worst any of us suffers is a traffic jam here or there or worse, a construction site. Imagine life in the late eighteenth century. People in this era had to deal with not only getting up at dawn to milk the cows, but toiling for hours on end with ...
    Related: ballard, martha, associate professor, national endowment, practical
  • Paul Revere - 864 words
    Paul Revere Paul Revere was an American patriot who, in 1775, carried news to Lexington of the approach of the British. He warned the patriot leaders, Samuel Adams and Johh Hancock of their danger and called the citizens of the countryside to arms. This was the inspirations of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem "Paul Revere's Ride". (Martin 266-267) In 1175, King George III instructed General Thomas Gage, the British commander in chief in Massachusetts, to enforce order among the rebellious colonist. Gage then orders Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith to move to Concord with a detachment of 700 men. Once there they were to destroy supplies and arrest Adams and Hancock for Treason. On the evenin ...
    Related: paul revere, revere, wadsworth longfellow, king george iii, burlington
  • Pres John Adams - 828 words
    Pres. John Adams John Adams is important to the study of American history because he was the second president of the United States, he served on the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence and then helped persuade the Second Continental Congress to adopt the declaration. He is one of the great figures in American history because before the American Revolution he joined with other patriots in resisting British rule. So, when the revolution began, Adams was among the first to propose American independence. John Adams was born and raised in Braintree, Massachusetts, on the farmland his great-grandfather had cleared 100 years earlier. He entered Harvard College when he was sixteen ...
    Related: abigail adams, john adams, john hancock, john quincy adams, quincy adams, samuel adams
  • Sam Adams - 1,124 words
    Sam Adams Every so often, a man of true passion is born. A man exceedingly dedicated to his principles, and very firm in his beliefs. Samuel Adams was such a man. Adams was a patriot, and one of the more influential men in the colonies. However, even as a patriot, he did not support the Constitution. How could such a patriot be an anti-federalist? Once again, it all comes down to an issue of beliefs. Samuel Adams was born on September 27, 1722. He was the son of a successful merchant and malter. As a boy, he attended Boston Grammar School. In 1736 he decided to enter Harvard. It was here that he became active in colonial politics. He joined such clubs as the Caucus Club, which was influentia ...
    Related: john adams, samuel adams, individual freedom, continental congress, harry
  • Shays Rebellion - 868 words
    Shay's Rebellion Critical Analysis Shay's Rebellion 1) Shays' Rebellion, the post-Revolutionary clash between New England farmers and merchants that tested the precarious institutions of the new republic, threatened to plunge the disunited states into a civil war. The rebellion arose in Massachusetts in 1786, spread to other states, and culminated in an abortive attack on a federal arsenal. It wound down in 1787 with the election of a more popular governor, an economic upswing, and the creation of the Constitution of the United States in Philadelphia. Shay's Rebellion was the first armed uprising of the new nation. It was caused by the absence of debt relief legislation in Massachusetts. Whe ...
    Related: daniel shays, rebellion, shays, shays rebellion, american history
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